Works and Days

The Works and Days (Ancient Greek: Ἔργα καὶ Ἡμέραι, Erga kai Hēmerai) is a didactic poem of some 800 verses written by the ancient Greek poet Hesiod around 700 BC. At its center, the Works and Days is a farmer's almanac in which Hesiod instructs his brother Perses in the agricultural arts. Scholars have seen this work against a background of agrarian crisis in mainland Greece, which inspired a wave of colonial expeditions in search of new land. In the poem Hesiod also offers his brother extensive moralizing advice on how he should live his life. The Works and Days is perhaps best known for its two mythological aetiologies for the toil and pain that define the human condition: the story of Prometheus and Pandora, and the so-called Myth of Five Ages.

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Works And Days - Select Editions and Translations - Translations
... (1983), Hesiod Theogony, Works and days, Shield, Baltimore, ISBN 0-8018-2998-4 ... (1993), Hesiod Works Days, Theogony, Indianapoli, ISBN 0-87220-179-1 ... (1996), Works and Days a translation and commentary for the social sciences, Berkeley, ISBN 0-520-20383-6 Most, G.W ...

Famous quotes containing the words days and/or works:

    When Wilson got upon his legs in those days he seems to have gone into a sort of trance, with all the peculiar illusions and delusions that belong to a pedagogue gone mashugga. He heard words giving three cheers; he saw them race across a blackboard like Mexicans pursued by the Polizei; he felt them rush up and kiss him.
    —H.L. (Henry Lewis)

    We all agree now—by “we” I mean intelligent people under sixty—that a work of art is like a rose. A rose is not beautiful because it is like something else. Neither is a work of art. Roses and works of art are beautiful in themselves. Unluckily, the matter does not end there: a rose is the visible result of an infinitude of complicated goings on in the bosom of the earth and in the air above, and similarly a work of art is the product of strange activities in the human mind.
    Clive Bell (1881–1962)