Who is robert neelly bellah?

Robert Neelly Bellah

Robert Neelly Bellah (born February 23, 1927) is an American sociologist, now the Elliott Professor of Sociology, Emeritus at the University of California, Berkeley. Bellah is best known for his work related to American civil religion (a term which he coined in a 1967 article). Bellah's magnum opus, Religion In Human Evolution, traces the biological and cultural origins of religion and the interplay between the two. Philosopher J├╝rgen Habermas wrote of Bellah's work: "This great book is the intellectual harvest of the rich academic life of a leading social theorist who has assimilated a vast range of biological, anthropological, and historical literature in the pursuit of a breathtaking project... In this field I do not know of an equally ambitious and comprehensive study." Bellah is also known for his 1985 book Habits of the Heart, how religion contributes to and detracts from America's common good; and as a sociologist who studies religious and moral issues and their connection to society.

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Robert Neelly Bellah - Awards and Honors
... Bellah was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1967 ... He received the National Humanities Medal in 2000 from President Bill Clinton, in part for "his efforts to illuminate the importance of community in American society." In 2007, he received the American Academy of Religion Martin E ...

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    However painful the process of leaving home, for parents and for children, the really frightening thing for both would be the prospect of the child never leaving home.
    —Robert Neelly Bellah (20th century)

    The family is in flux, and signs of trouble are widespread. Expectations remain high. But realities are disturbing.
    —Robert Neelly Bellah (20th century)

    However painful the process of leaving home, for parents and for children, the really frightening thing for both would be the prospect of the child never leaving home.
    —Robert Neelly Bellah (20th century)