Who is rip van ronkel?

Some articles on van:

Van, Texas - Education
... The City of Van is served by the Van Independent School District and home to the Van High School Vandals ...
Van Eyck
... Van Eyck (or van Eyck), also Van Eijk (or van Eijk) is a Dutch surname meaning "of Eyck" or "of Eijk" (literal translation "of the Oak tree") ...
Van Gogh Museum - History
... Upon Vincent van Gogh's death in 1890, his work not sold fell into the possession of his brother Theo ... leaving the work in the possession of his widow, Johanna van Gogh-Bonger ... The collection was inherited by her son Vincent Willem van Gogh in 1925, eventually loaned to the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam where it displayed for many years, and was transferred to ...
Famous Inhabitants of Ommen
... Albertus van Raalte (1811–1876), preacher and founder of Holland, Michigan August Pieter van Groeningen (1866–1894), writer Johanna van Buren (1881–1981), poet C.J.E ...
Obdam - Chronology
... 1503 - The van Duvenvoorde family becomes the Lordship of the town. 1610 - Birth of Jacob, Baron van Wassenaer, Lord of Obdam Son of Jacob van Duvenvoorde van Wassenaer 1620 - Jacob van Duvenvoorde starts using the van Wassenaer family name and becomes Jacob ... Jacob, Baron van Wassenaer, Lord of Obdam by Abraham Evertsz ...

Famous quotes containing the words rip van, van ronkel, rip and/or van:

    As a father I had some trouble finding the words to separate the person from the deed. Usually, when one of my sons broke the rules or a window, I was too angry to speak calmly and objectively. My own solution was to express my feelings, but in an exaggerated, humorous way: “You do that again and you will be grounded so long they will call you Rip Van Winkle II,” or “If I hear that word again, I’m going to braid your tongue.”
    David Elkind (20th century)

    Not only is this the greatest adventure awaiting mankind, but it’s the greatest challenge ever hurled at American industry.
    —Rip Van Ronkel, and Robert A. Heinlein (1907–1988)

    As a father I had some trouble finding the words to separate the person from the deed. Usually, when one of my sons broke the rules or a window, I was too angry to speak calmly and objectively. My own solution was to express my feelings, but in an exaggerated, humorous way: “You do that again and you will be grounded so long they will call you Rip Van Winkle II,” or “If I hear that word again, I’m going to braid your tongue.”
    David Elkind (20th century)

    Language is a social art.
    —Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)