Who is Berkeley?

  • (noun): Irish philosopher and Anglican bishop who opposed the materialism of Thomas Hobbes (1685-1753).
    Synonyms: Bishop Berkeley, George Berkeley
    See also — Additional definitions below

Some articles on berkeley:

Bob Switzer
... born in Fromberg, Montana and raised in Berkeley California ... at the University of California, Berkeley ... a medical doctor, but while unloading crates at the Heinz Ketchup factory in Berkeley, California, he tripped and fell, entering into a coma for several months after the accident ...
Allan V. Cox - Biography
... Cox began studying chemistry at the University of California, Berkeley ... He returned to Berkeley, but had so little interest in chemistry that his grades were too low to avoid being drafted into the United States Army ... For his graduate research at the University of California, Berkeley, Cox concentrated on rock magnetism with John Verhoogen as his supervisor ...
Berkeley High School
... Berkeley High School refers to the following high schools Berkeley High School (Berkeley, California) Berkeley High School (Moncks Corner, South Carolina ...
Berkeley, Ontario
... Berkeley is a community on Ontario Highway 10 in the township of Chatsworth, Grey County, Ontario, Canada ... The Berkeley Post Office was opened in 1853 ... There were three churches in Berkeley a Presbyterian Church, an Anglican church and a United Church ...
Berkeley Unified School District
... Berkeley Unified School District is the public school district for the city of Berkeley, California ... Its administrative offices are located in Berkeley's old city hall on Martin Luther King Jr ...

More definitions of "Berkeley":

  • (noun): A city in California on the eastern shore of San Francisco Bay; site of the University of California at Berkeley.

Famous quotes containing the word berkeley:

    Query: Whether the difference between a mere computer and a man of science be not, that the one computes on principles clearly conceived, and by rules evidently demonstrated, whereas the other doth not?
    —George Berkeley (1685–1753)

    The real essence, the internal qualities, and constitution of even the meanest object, is hid from our view; something there is in every drop of water, every grain of sand, which it is beyond the power of human understanding to fathom or comprehend. But it is evident ... that we are influenced by false principles to that degree as to mistrust our senses, and think we know nothing of those things which we perfectly comprehend.
    —George Berkeley (1685–1753)

    It seems, Euphranor..., that there is nothing so singularly absurd as we are apt to think, in the belief of mysteries; and that a man need not renounce his reason to maintain his religion. But if this were true, how comes it to pass, that, in proportion as men abound in knowledge, they dwindle in faith?
    —George Berkeley (1685–1753)