White Marble Mansion

Some articles on marble, marbles, white marble mansion, mansion, white:

Marble Drop - Puzzle Pieces
... Start Funnel The piece that allows a player to drop a new marble onto the track ... Conveyor Lift Raises marbles up to a higher track ... Diverter Redirects the marbles onto one of several tracks based on the state of the diverter ...
Ruin Marble
... Ruin marble is a kind of limestone or marble that contains light and dark patterns, giving the impression of a ruined cityscape ...
Mundelein College - Campus - Libraries
... Mundelein College moved its library in 1934 to the white marble mansion purchased from Albert Mussey Johnson ... Reading rooms occupied the first two floors of the mansion while the former ballroom on the third floor housed the book stacks ... The white marble mansion remained the college's library until 1967 ...
Pierre Alexandre Schoenewerk - Selected Works
... La jeune Tarantine (Young Tarantine), marble, 1871 (Musée d'Orsay) L'Europe (Musée d'Orsay square) Jeune fille à la Fontaine, marble, 1873 The bather, marble Andromeda ...
Marble, Minnesota - Demographics - 2000 Census
... The racial makeup of the city was 96.83% White, 1.29% Native American, 0.29% Asian, 0.14% from other races, and 1.44% from two or more races ...

Famous quotes containing the words mansion, white and/or marble:

    Look,
    I draw the sword myself; take it, and hit
    The innocent mansion of my love, my heart.
    Fear not, ‘tis empty of all things but grief.
    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)

    ...the shiny-cheeked merchant bankers from London with eighties striped blue ties and white collars and double-barreled names and double chins and double-breasted suits, who said “ears” when they meant “yes” and “hice” when they meant “house” and “school” when they meant “Eton”...
    John le Carré (b. 1931)

    where the Statue stood
    Of Newton, with his Prism and silent Face
    The marble index of a Mind for ever
    Voyaging through strange seas of Thought, alone.
    William Wordsworth (1770–1850)