What is security engineering?

Security Engineering

Security engineering is a specialized field of engineering that focuses on the security aspects in the design of systems that need to be able to deal robustly with possible sources of disruption, ranging from natural disasters to malicious acts. It is similar to other systems engineering activities in that its primary motivation is to support the delivery of engineering solutions that satisfy pre-defined functional and user requirements, but with the added dimension of preventing misuse and malicious behavior. These constraints and restrictions are often asserted as a security policy.

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Some articles on security engineering:

Security Engineering - Criticisms - Use of The Term Engineer
... criticize this field as not being a bona fide field of engineering because the methodologies of this field are less formal or excessively ad-hoc compared to other fields ...
Evaluation Assurance Level - Assurance Levels - EAL5: Semiformally Designed and Tested
... EAL5 permits a developer to gain maximum assurance from security engineering based upon rigorous commercial development practices supported by moderate application of specialist security engineering ... circumstances where developers or users require a high level of independently assured security in a planned development and require a rigorous development approach without incurring ...

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