What is sake?

  • (noun): Japanese alcoholic beverage made from fermented rice; usually served hot.
    Synonyms: saki, rice beer
    See also — Additional definitions below

Sake

Sake (/ˈsɑːkeɪ/ or /ˈsɑːki/) is an alcoholic beverage of Japanese origin that is made from fermented rice. It may also be spelled saké or saki.

Read more about Sake.

Some articles on sake:

Saijō, Hiroshima (Kamo) - Sake
... If Saijō is famed for one thing in particular, it is sake (rice wine) ... the narrow streets of the Sakagura Dori ("Sake Storehouse Road") area near JR Saijō Station are the Namako wall (white-lattice walled) and Sekishu Gawara (red-roof tile) roofs of ten well-known sake ... Each October there is also the Saijō Sake Matsuri 酒まつり (Sake Festival) which draws crowds of between 100-200,000 revelers and sake connoisseurs before the brewing season (October–March) begins ...
Sakura Sake - Track List
... "Sakura Sake" Takeshi Aida (相田 毅, Aida Takeshi?), Sho Sakurai Shin Tanimoto (谷本 新, Tanimoto Shin?) 423 2 ... "Sakura Sake" (Karaoke) Aida, Sakurai Tanimoto 423 4 ... "Sakura Sake" Aida, Sakurai Tanimoto 423 2 ...
Philip Harper (sake Brewer) - Current Career
... used his expertise in brewing to create his own brand of sake for the brewery ... for his excellent brands of sake ... Harper continues to brew sake at Kinoshita-Shuzou, hoping to spread the taste of the traditional Japanese drink throughout the world and revive the brew in its homeland ...
Sawanotsuru
... The company was founded in 1717 in Nada-ku, Kobe, a region famous for sake production ... its sake is exported to approximately 30 countries ...

More definitions of "sake":

  • (noun): The purpose of achieving or obtaining.
    Example: "For the sake of argument"
  • (noun): A reason for wanting something done.
    Example: "For your sake"; "died for the sake of his country"
    Synonyms: interest

Famous quotes containing the word sake:

    True love ennobles and dignifies the material labors of life; and homely services rendered for love’s sake have in them a poetry that is immortal.
    Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811–1896)

    The essence of being human is that one does not seek perfection, that one is sometimes willing to commit sins for the sake of loyalty, that one does not push asceticism to the point where it makes friendly intercourse impossible, and that one is prepared in the end to be defeated and broken up by life, which is the inevitable price of fastening one’s love upon other human individuals.
    George Orwell (1903–1950)

    Most women of [the WW II] generation have but one image of good motherhood—the one their mothers embodied. . . . Anything done “for the sake of the children” justified, even ennobled the mother’s role. Motherhood was tantamount to martyrdom during that unique era when children were gods. Those who appeared to put their own needs first were castigated and shunned—the ultimate damnation for a gender trained to be wholly dependent on the acceptance and praise of others.
    Melinda M. Marshall (20th century)