What is remark?

  • (noun): A statement that expresses a personal opinion or belief.
    Synonyms: comment
    See also — Additional definitions below

Remark

A comment is generally a verbal or written remark often related to an added piece of information, or an observation or statement. These are usually marked with an abbreviation, such as "obs." or "N.B.". The term "comment" may have different meanings depending on specific fields of usage.

Read more about Remark.

Some articles on remark:

Characteristics Of Harold Pinter's Work - Characteristics of Pinter's Work - Comedy of Menace
... Over the years I have seen that remark quoted in a number of learned columns ... But for me the remark meant precisely nothing ... contrary, many reviewers and other critics consider the remark, though facetious, an apt description of his plays ...
ATS Theorem - Remark
... On the applications of ATS to the problems of physics see, see also. ...
Tony Gordon - Reception
... In one episode he remarks "I could no more fancy Rosie Webster (Helen Flanagan) than I could support Glasgow Rangers" ... Supporters of Rangers took offence to this remark and flooded the ITV switchboard with calls of protest as they thought the remark was a retaliation for the 2008 UEFA Cup Final Riots involving Rangers fans ... The Scottish Tourist Board claimed that this remark lead to a 4% increase in the historical figure from tourists ...

More definitions of "remark":

  • (noun): Explicit notice.
    Example: "It passed without remark"

Famous quotes containing the word remark:

    Alice felt dreadfully puzzled. The Hatter’s remark seemed to her to have no sort of meaning in it, and yet it was certainly English. “I don’t quite understand you,” she said, as politely as she could.
    Lewis Carroll [Charles Lutwidge Dodgson] (1832–1898)

    Your remark that clams will lie quiet if music be played to them, was superfluous—entirely superfluous.
    Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835–1910)

    The surest way to make a monkey of a man is to quote him. That remark in itself wouldn’t make any sense if quoted as it stands.
    Robert Benchley (1889–1945)