What is prose edda?

Some articles on prose edda, edda:

Einherjar - Attestations - Prose Edda
... In the Prose Edda book Gylfaginning, the einherjar are introduced in chapter 20 ... The einherjar receive a final mention in the Prose Edda in chapter 2 of the book Skáldskaparmál, where a quote from the anonymous 10th century poem Eiríksmál is provided (see the Fagrskinna section below for more ...
Thor - Attestations - Post-Viking Age - Prose Edda, Heimskringla, and Sagas
... In the prologue to his Prose Edda, Snorri Sturluson euhemerises Thor as a prince of Troy, and the son of king Memnon by Troana, a daughter of Priam ... In the Prose Edda, Thor is mentioned in all four books Prologue, Gylfaginning, Skáldskaparmál, and Háttatal ...
Sumarr And Vetr - Attestations - Prose Edda
... In chapter 19 of the Prose Edda book Gylfaginning, Gangleri (king Gylfi in disguise) asks why there's an evident difference between summer and winter ... Sumarr and Vetr are additionally personified in the Prose Edda book Skáldskaparmál, where they are referred to in kennings ...
Nine Worlds - Nine Homeworlds - Prose Edda
... In the Prose Edda, the phrase occurs here ... Gylfaginning 34 threw Hel into Niflheimr and gave her authority over the nine worlds ...
Gefjun
... Gefjon is attested in the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier traditional sources the Prose Edda and Heimskringla, written in the 13th ... The Prose Edda and Heimskringla both report that Gefjon plowed away what is now lake Mälaren, Sweden, and with this land formed the island of Zealand, Denmark ... In addition, the Prose Edda describes that not only is Gefjon a virgin herself, but that all who die a virgin become her attendants ...

Famous quotes containing the word prose:

    Poetry is the language in which man explores his own amazement ... says heaven and earth in one word ... speaks of himself and his predicament as though for the first time. It has the virtue of being able to say twice as much as prose in half the time, and the drawback, if you do not give it your full attention, of seeming to say half as much in twice the time.
    Christopher Fry (b. 1907)