What is porcelain?

  • (noun): Ceramic ware made of a more or less translucent ceramic.

Porcelain

Porcelain is a ceramic material made by heating raw materials, generally including clay in the form of kaolin, in a kiln to temperatures between 1,200 °C (2,192 °F) and 1,400 °C (2,552 °F). The toughness, strength, and translucence of porcelain arise mainly from the formation of glass and the mineral mullite within the fired body at these high temperatures.

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Some articles on porcelain:

Porcelain - Manufacturers
1735 Manifattura di Doccia, (1735–present) Hungary Herend Porcelain Manufacture, (1826–present) Hollóháza Porcelain Manufacture, (1777,1831–present) Zsolnay Porcelain Manufacture, (1853–present) Germany ...
Living Dead Dolls - Other Official Merchandise - Porcelain Dolls (2003)
... In 2003, 18 inch porcelain dolls of Posey and Abigail Crane were made ... They had porcelain heads, hands and feet ... The porcelain Abigail Crane was exclusive to Mezco Online while the porcelain Posey (limited to 4000 pieces) was distributed worldwide ...
Carlo Ginori
... Marchese Carlo Ginori (1702–1757), Italian politician (Tuscany) and founder of the Doccia porcelain factory in Sesto Fiorentino, near Florence, Italy ... He pioneered the development of porcelain production, contemporary with Meissen, in mid-eighteenth-century Europe ... Ginori's porcelain was collected by Medicis and most of the nobility of Europe ...
Lichte - History
... Already in 1764 there was porcelain manufacturing in Lichte (Wallendorf) ... The Wallendorf porcelain manufacture is one of the oldest in Europe ... Thus as early as 1822, Johann Heinrich Leder established in Lichte another porcelain company, today’s Lichte porcelain (GmbH) ...
Blanc De Chine
... from China") is the traditional European term for a type of white Chinese porcelain, made at Dehua in the Fujian province, otherwise known as Dehua porcelain or similar terms ... Large quantities arrived in Europe as Chinese Export Porcelain in the early 18th century and it was copied at Meissen and elsewhere ...