What is legal philosophy?

  • (noun): The branch of philosophy concerned with the law and the principles that lead courts to make the decisions they do.
    Synonyms: jurisprudence, law

Some articles on legal philosophy, legal, philosophy:

Conventionalism - Legal Philosophy
... Conventionalism, as applied to legal philosophy, provides a justification for state coercion ... rival conceptions of law constructed by American legal philosopher Ronald Dworkin in his work Law's Empire ... The other two conceptions of law are legal pragmatism and law as integrity ...
Cass Sunstein - Views - Legal Philosophy
... Sunstein is a proponent of judicial minimalism, arguing that judges should focus primarily on deciding the case at hand, and avoid making sweeping changes to the law or decisions that have broad-reaching effects ... Some view him as liberal, despite Sunstein's public support for George W ...
List Of Harvard Law School Alumni - Academia - Legal Academia - Legal Philosophy
... Randy Barnett, libertarian legal theorist Ronald Dworkin, legal and political philosopher Richard Posner (LL.B ...
Brian Leiter - Philosophy
... Leiter's scholarly writings have been in two main areas legal philosophy and Continental philosophy ... In legal philosophy, he has offered a reinterpretation of the American Legal Realists as prescient philosophical naturalists and a general defense of ... In his writing on German philosophy, Leiter defends a reading of Nietzsche as a philosophical naturalist, most notably in Nietzsche on Morality (London Routledge ...

Famous quotes containing the words philosophy and/or legal:

    My position is a naturalistic one; I see philosophy not as an a priori propaedeutic or groundwork for science, but as continuous with science. I see philosophy and science as in the same boat—a boat which, to revert to Neurath’s figure as I so often do, we can rebuild only at sea while staying afloat in it. There is no external vantage point, no first philosophy.
    Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    ... whilst you are proclaiming peace and good will to men, Emancipating all Nations, you insist upon retaining absolute power over wives. But you must remember that Arbitrary power is like most other things which are very hard, very liable to be broken—and notwithstanding all your wise Laws and Maxims we have it in our power not only to free ourselves but to subdue our Masters, and without violence throw both your natural and legal authority at our feet ...
    Abigail Adams (1744–1818)