What is laser level?

Laser Level

In surveying and construction, the laser level is affixed to a tripod, leveled and then spun to illuminate a horizontal plane. The laser beam projector employs a rotating head with a mirror for sweeping the laser beam about a vertical axis. If the mirror is not self-leveling, it is provided with visually readable level vials and manually adjustable screws for orienting the projector. A staff carried by the operator is equipped with a movable sensor, which can detect the laser beam and gives a signal when the sensor is in line with the beam (usually an audible beep). The position of the sensor on the graduated staff allows comparison of elevations between different points on the terrain.

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Some articles on laser level:

Laser Level
... In surveying and construction, the laser level is affixed to a tripod, leveled and then spun to illuminate a horizontal plane ... The laser beam projector employs a rotating head with a mirror for sweeping the laser beam about a vertical axis ... is not self-leveling, it is provided with visually readable level vials and manually adjustable screws for orienting the projector ...
Levelling Instruments - Laser Level
... Laser levels project a beam which is visible and/or detectable by a sensor on the leveling rod ...
Quantum Cascade Laser - Operating Principles - Active Region Designs
... In order to decrease, the overlap of the upper and lower laser levels is reduced ... the layer thicknesses such that the upper laser level is mostly localised in the left-hand well of the 3QW active region, while the lower laser level wave function is made to mostly reside in the central ... A vertical transition is one in which the upper laser level is localised in mainly the central and right-hand wells ...

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