What is Helen Hunt Jackson?

Helen Hunt Jackson

Helen Maria Hunt Jackson, born Helen Fiske (October 15, 1830 – August 12, 1885 ), was a United States writer who became an activist on behalf of improved treatment of Native Americans by the U.S. government. She detailed the adverse effects of government actions in her history A Century of Dishonor (1881). Her novel Ramona dramatized the federal government's mistreatment of Native Americans in Southern California and attracted considerable attention to her cause, although its popularity was based on its romantic and picturesque qualities rather than its political content. It was estimated to have been reprinted 300 times, and contributed to the growth of tourism in Southern California.

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Helen Hunt Jackson Branch
... Helen Hunt Jackson Branch is a former branch library of the Los Angeles Public Library ... The branch was named for 19th Century American author Helen Hunt Jackson whose popular novel Ramona told the story of a romance between a mixed-race girl and an American Indian during the days ... which was divided into two branches, the Helen Hunt Jackson Branch and the Bret Harte Branch ...

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