What is Charles Sanders Peirce?

  • (noun): United States philosopher and logician; pioneer of pragmatism (1839-1914).

Charles Sanders Peirce

Charles Sanders Peirce ( /ˈpɜrs/ like "purse"; September 10, 1839 – April 19, 1914) was an American philosopher, logician, mathematician, and scientist, sometimes known as "the father of pragmatism". He was educated as a chemist and employed as a scientist for 30 years. Today he is appreciated largely for his contributions to logic, mathematics, philosophy, scientific methodology, and semiotics, and for his founding of pragmatism. In 1934, the philosopher Paul Weiss called Peirce "the most original and versatile of American philosophers and America's greatest logician".

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Some articles on Charles Sanders Peirce:

Charles Sanders Peirce Bibliography - Secondary Literature - Other Works
... Peirce, Springer catalog page, 192 pages, hardcover (ISBN 978-9024735747, ISBN 90-247-3574-2). 1995), "Peirce Rustled, Russell Pierced How Charles Peirce and Bertrand Russell Viewed Each Other's Work in Logic, and an Assessment of Russell's Accuracy and Role in ... Arisbe Eprint (1997), "Tarski's Development of Peirce's Logic of Relations" (Google Books Eprint), in Studies in the Logic of Charles Sanders Peirce, Indiana University Press catalog page ...
Charles Sanders Peirce - Science of Review
... Main article Classification of the sciences (Peirce) Peirce outlined two fields, "Cenoscopy" and "Science of Review", both of which he called philosophy ... Peirce placed, within Science of Review, the work and theory of classifying the sciences (including mathematics and philosophy) ...
History Of Scientific Method - Integrating Deductive and Inductive Method - Charles Sanders Peirce
... In the late 19th century, Charles Sanders Peirce proposed a schema that would turn out to have considerable influence in the further development of scientific method generally ... Peirce's work quickly accelerated the progress on several fronts ... Firstly, speaking in broader context in "How to Make Our Ideas Clear" (1878), Peirce outlined an objectively verifiable method to test the truth of putative ...
Charles Sanders Peirce Bibliography - Secondary Literature - Anthologies and Journals' Special Issues
1965), Perspectives on Peirce Critical Essays on Charles Sanders Peirce, Yale University Press, 148 pages (ISBN 0300003080), reprinted, Greenwood Press, Westport, CT, 148 pages, hardcover (ISBN 978-0-313-22414-0 ... Amazon lists Peirce as author and Bernstein as editor, but it appears to be an anthology of essays about Peirce ... Peirce Categories to Constantinople Proceedings of the International Symposium on Peirce Leuven 1997, Leuven University Press, 154 pages, paperback (ISBN 978-9061869399, ISBN 90-6186-939-0 ...
Charles Sanders Peirce Bibliography
... This Charles Sanders Peirce bibliography consolidates numerous references to Charles Sanders Peirce's writings, including letters, manuscripts ... For an extensive chronological list of Peirce's works (titled in English), see the Chronologische Übersicht (Chronological Overview) on the Schriften (Writings) page for Charles Sanders Peirce ...

Famous quotes containing the words charles sanders, sanders peirce, peirce and/or sanders:

    If an opinion can eventually go to the determination of a practical belief, it, in so far, becomes itself a practical belief; and every proposition that is not pure metaphysical jargon and chatter must have some possible bearing upon practice.
    Charles Sanders Peirce (1839–1914)

    ... if it be true that death is annihilation, then the man who believes that he will certainly go straight to heaven when he dies, provided he has fulfilled certain simply observances in this life, has a cheap pleasure which will not be followed by the least disappointment.
    —Charles Sanders Peirce (1839–1914)

    I think of consciousness as a bottomless lake, whose waters seem transparent, yet into which we can clearly see but a little way. But in this water there are countless objects at different depths; and certain influences will give certain kinds of those objects an upward influence which may be intense enough and continue long enough to bring them into the upper visible layer. After the impulse ceases they commence to sink downwards.
    —Charles Sanders Peirce (1839–1914)

    The real, then, is that which, sooner or later, information and reasoning would finally result in, and which is therefore independent of the vagaries of me and you. Thus, the very origin of the conception of reality shows that this conception essentially involves the notion of a COMMUNITY, without definite limits, and capable of a definite increase of knowledge.
    —Charles Sanders Peirce (1839–1914)