What is bachelor?

Bachelor

A bachelor is a man who is not married (see single person) or who is not in a pair bond. It includes "men who live independently, outside of their parents' home and other institutional settings, who are neither married nor cohabitating".

Read more about Bachelor.

Some articles on bachelor:

Grace Annie Lockhart
... was the first woman in the British Empire to receive a Bachelor's degree ... She received a Bachelor of Science ... in Sackville, New Brunswick, Canada in 1874 and graduated with a degree of Bachelor of Science and English Literature on May 25, 1875 ...
Historical Examples of Bachelors (men Who Never Married)
... Heraclitus Plato Epicurus Horace Plotinus Augustine Aquinas da Vinci Copernicus Raphael Brahe Galileo Descartes Pascal Locke Spinoza Newton Leibniz Bayle Vivaldi Handel Pope Voltaire Hume Smith Kant Gibbon Beethoven Schopenhauer Buchanan Schubert Chopin Kierkegaard Thoreau Brahms James Van Gogh Nietzsche Kafka Tesla Sartre. ...
UNSW School Of English, Media And Performing Arts - Undergraduate Degrees Offered
... Bachelor of Arts (with Majors in English Media, Culture and Technology Film Studies Theatre and Performance Studies and Music) Bachelor of Arts (Media and Communications ...
UNSW School Of History And Philosophy - Undergraduate Degrees Offered
... Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Arts Bachelor of Social Science. ...
Comenius University, Faculty Of Mathematics, Physics And Informatics - Bachelor Study
... Single specializations of bachelor study are Mathematical Methods in Economy, Experimental Methods of Physics and Software Development ... These branches enable to attain the Bachelor of Science degree after 3 years of study ...

More definitions of "bachelor":

  • (noun): A man who has never been married.
    Synonyms: unmarried man
  • (verb): Lead a bachelor's existence.
    Synonyms: bach

Famous quotes containing the word bachelor:

    The wonderful scope and variety of female loveliness, if too long suffered to sway us without decision, shall finally confound all power of selection. The confirmed bachelor is, in America, at least, quite as often the victim of a too profound appreciation of the infinite charmingness of woman, as made solitary for life by the legitimate empire of a cold and tasteless temperament.
    Herman Melville (1819–1891)

    ‘I told him, Look at all those fightings and killings down there,
    What’s the matter? Why don’t you put a stop to it?
    ‘I try, he said—That’s all he could do, he looked tired. He’s a bachelor so long, and he likes lentil soup.’
    Allen Ginsberg (b. 1926)

    Somehow, a bachelor never quite gets over the idea that he is a thing of beauty and a boy for ever!
    Helen Rowland (1875–1950)