What are reports?

Reports

A report or account is any informational work (usually of writing, speech, television, or film) made with the specific intention of relaying information or recounting certain events in a widely presentable form.

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Some articles on reports:

Broadband Reports - Community
... Broadband Reports operates over 200 forums, many of which focus on Internet and computer-related topics ... a million total registered users on the Broadband Reports forums, with about 10% of those active participants ... The members of the Broadband Reports community usually use the acronym "BBR" to refer to the site, although members who registered prior to the name change still refer to ...
Richard Peters (reporter) - Works and Other Writing
... Reports of the United States Circuit Court, 1803-18 (1819) Reports of the United States Supreme Court, 1828-43 (seventeen volumes, 1828–43) *Condensed Reports of Cases in ...
Marfa Lights - History
... Reports often describe brightly glowing basketball-sized spheres floating above the ground, or sometimes high in the air ... They often appear in pairs or groups, according to reports, to divide into pairs or to merge, to disappear and reappear, and sometimes to move in seemingly regular patterns ... There are no reliable reports of daytime sightings ...

Famous quotes containing the word reports:

    The three-year-old who lies about taking a cookie isn’t really a “liar” after all. He simply can’t control his impulses. He then convinces himself of a new truth and, eager for your approval, reports the version that he knows will make you happy.
    Cathy Rindner Tempelsman (20th century)

    He who is only a traveler learns things at second-hand and by the halves, and is poor authority. We are most interested when science reports what those men already know practically or instinctively, for that alone is a true humanity, or account of human experience.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    I think a Person who is thus terrifyed [sic] with the Imagination of Ghosts and Spectres much more reasonable, than one who contrary to the Reports of all Historians sacred and profane, ancient and modern, and to the Traditions of all Nations, thinks the Appearance of Spirits fabulous and groundless.
    Joseph Addison (1672–1719)