Weimar Republic

The Weimar Republic (German: Weimarer Republik ) is the name given by historians to the federal republic and parliamentary representative democracy established in 1919 in Germany to replace the imperial form of government. It was named after Weimar, the city where the constitutional assembly took place.

Following World War I, the republic emerged from the German Revolution in November 1918. In 1919, a national assembly was convened in Weimar, where a new constitution for the German Reich was written, then adopted on 11 August of that same year. The ensuing period of liberal democracy lapsed in the early 1930s, leading to the ascent of the nascent Nazi Party and Adolf Hitler in 1933. The legal measures taken by the Nazi government in February and March 1933, commonly known as Gleichschaltung ("coordination") meant that the government could legislate contrary to the constitution. The republic nominally continued to exist until 1945, as the constitution was never formally repealed. However, the measures taken by the Nazis in the early part of their rule rendered the constitution irrelevant. Thus, 1933 is usually seen as the end of the Weimar Republic and the beginning of Hitler's Third Reich.

In its fourteen years, the Weimar Republic faced numerous problems, including hyperinflation, political extremists (with paramilitaries – both left and right wing), and hostility from the victors of World War I, who tried twice to restructure Germany's reparations payments through the Dawes Plan and the Young Plan. However, it overcame many of the requirements of the Treaty of Versailles (Germany eventually repaid a reduced amount of the reparations required of the treaty, with the last payment being made on 3 October 2010), reformed the currency, and unified tax politics and the railway system, as well as having a unique cultural impact with its art, music and cinema. Germany continued to lead the world in science and technology during this period.

Read more about Weimar RepublicName, Flag and Coat of Arms, November Revolution, Treaty of Versailles, Allied Rhineland Occupation, Years of Crisis (1919–1923), Military, Golden Era (1924–1929), Aftermath, Reasons For The Republic's Failure, Constituent States

Other articles related to "weimar republic, republics, weimar, republic":

Weimar Republic - Constituent States
... of 1918–1919, the remaining states continued as republics ... The former Ernestine duchies continued briefly as republics before merging to form the state of Thuringia in 1920, except for Saxe-Coburg, which became part of Bavaria ... Saxony (Sachsen) Dresden Schaumburg-Lippe Bückeburg Thuringia (Thüringen) - from 1920 Weimar Waldeck-Pyrmont - to Prussia in 1921/1929 Arolsen Württemberg Stuttgart City-states ...
Mühsam - Biography - Weimar Years: 1918–1933
... assassination in 1919, the Bayerische Räterepublik (Bavarian Soviet Republic) was proclaimed, ruled by independent socialist Ernst Toller and anarchists Gustav Landauer and Erich Mühsam ... However, during this time, the Bavarian Soviet Republic declared war on Switzerland, resulting from the inexplicable machinations of a mentally-ill Foreign Affairs deputy who ... When the Weimar Republic's Freikorps, a right-wing army commanded by Gustav Noske, crushed the rebellion and took possession of Munich, Gustav Landauer was killed and Mühsam ...
Lindau (Katlenburg-Lindau) - History - Weimar Republic (1918-1933)
... abbreviated 'Zentrum', held a special supremacy in the district during the period of the Weimar Republic ... This high vote was maintained through all the years of the Weimar Republic until 1932, when with the last free elections this party still gained 60.8% of the vote while in many other places ... The last months of the Weimar Republic were shaped by violent political arguments in Lindau, with many party meetings and banners in the village ...

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