Weapon of Mass Destruction

A weapon of mass destruction (WMD) is a weapon that can kill and bring significant harm to a large number of humans (and other life forms) and/or cause great damage to man-made structures (e.g. buildings), natural structures (e.g. mountains), or the biosphere in general. The scope and application of the term has evolved and been disputed, often signifying more politically than technically. Coined in reference to aerial bombing with chemical explosives, it has come to distinguish large-scale weaponry of other technologies, such as chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear. This differentiates the term from more technical ones such as chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear weapons (CBRN).

Read more about Weapon Of Mass Destruction:  Early Uses of The Term Weapon of Mass Destruction, Treaties, United States Politics, Media Coverage of WMD, Public Perceptions of WMD, WMD in Popular Culture, Common Hazard Symbols

Other articles related to "weapon of mass destruction":

Weapon Of Mass Destruction - Common Hazard Symbols - Biological Weaponry/hazard Symbol
... According to Charles Dullin, an environmental-health engineer who contributed to its development We wanted something that was memorable but meaningless, so we could educate people as to what it means. ...

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