Washington Irving Memorial Park and Arboretum

Washington Irving Memorial Park and Arboretum (32.5 acres) is a public park and arboretum located just north of the Arkansas River Bridge at 13700 S. Memorial Drive, Bixby, Oklahoma. The park is named in honor of American writer Washington Irving, who camped in the area in October 1832 while participating in a federal expedition to the American West led by Judge Henry L. Ellsworth of Connecticut. The expedition included a 31-day, 350-mile (560 km) circular tour of central Oklahoma.

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Washington Irving Memorial Park And Arboretum - Irving in Oklahoma
... in Oklahoma on October 8, 1832, along with Irving, naturalist Charles La Trobe, and Swiss nobleman Albert de Pourtal├Ęs ... Irving had been absent from the United States for seventeen years before returning to New York only a few months earlier ... Irving's experience in Oklahoma included scouting for prairie hens, hunting wolves, and trading with members of the Osage Nation ...

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    The sorrow for the dead is the only sorrow from which we refuse to be divorced. Every other wound we seek to heal—every other affliction to forget: but this wound we consider it a duty to keep open—this affliction we cherish and brood over in solitude.
    Washington Irving (1783–1859)

    and the words never said,
    And the ominous, ominous dancing ahead.
    We sat in the car park till twenty to one
    And now I’m engaged to Miss Joan Hunter Dunn.
    Sir John Betjeman (1906–1984)

    ... Washington was not only an important capital. It was a city of fear. Below that glittering and delightful surface there is another story, that of underpaid Government clerks, men and women holding desperately to work that some political pull may at any moment take from them. A city of men in office and clutching that office, and a city of struggle which the country never suspects.
    Mary Roberts Rinehart (1876–1958)

    Those men are most apt to be obsequious and conciliating abroad, who are under the discipline of shrews at home.
    —Washington Irving (1783–1859)

    I hope there will be no effort to put up a shaft or any monument of that sort in memory of me or of the other women who have given themselves to our work. The best kind of a memorial would be a school where girls could be taught everything useful that would help them to earn an honorable livelihood; where they could learn to do anything they were capable of, just as boys can. I would like to have lived to see such a school as that in every great city of the United States.
    Susan B. Anthony (1820–1906)