Ward - in Designated Areas or Social Units

In Designated Areas or Social Units

  • Ward (country subdivision), electoral district or unit of local government
    • Wards of Japan
    • Wards of the United Kingdom
    • Wards of the United States
  • Ward (fortification), part of a castle
  • Ward (LDS Church), local congregation
  • Ward, a division, floor or room of a hospital set aside for a particular class or group of patients, for example a convalescent or psychiatric ward

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