Wading Birds

Some articles on birds, wading birds, wading:

Fauna Of Réunion - Birds
... Procellariiformes Diomedeidae Among the largest of flying birds, and the great albatrosses from the genus Diomedea have the largest wingspans of any extant birds ... Relatives of the petrels, and are the smallest of sea-birds. 2 ... Tropicbirds Pelecaniformes Phaethontidae Slender white birds of tropical oceans, with exceptionally long central tail feathers ...
Everglades National Park - Threats To The Park and Ecology - Diversion and Quality of Water
... Populations of wading birds dwindled 90 percent from their original numbers between the 1940s and 2000s ... Low levels of water leave fish vulnerable to reptiles and birds, and as sawgrass dries it can burn or die off, which in turn kills apple snails and other animals that wading ... Populations of birds fluctuate in 2009, the South Florida Water Management District claimed wading birds across South Florida increased by 335 percent ...
Wildlife Of Réunion - Fauna - Birds
... on Réunion Albatrosses Procellariiformes Diomedeidae Among the largest of flying birds, and the great albatrosses from the genus Diomedea have the ... Hydrobatidae Relatives of the petrels, and are the smallest of sea-birds ... Pelecaniformes Phaethontidae Slender white birds of tropical oceans, with exceptionally long central tail feathers ...

Famous quotes containing the words birds and/or wading:

    In a herber green, asleep where I lay,
    The birds sang sweet in the mids of the day;
    I dreamed fast of mirth and play.
    In youth is pleasure, in youth is pleasure.
    Robert Wever (fl. C. 1550)

    Poor John Field!—I trust he does not read this, unless he will improve by it,—thinking to live by some derivative old-country mode in this primitive new country.... With his horizon all his own, yet he a poor man, born to be poor, with his inherited Irish poverty or poor life, his Adam’s grandmother and boggy ways, not to rise in this world, he nor his posterity, till their wading webbed bog-trotting feet get talaria to their heels.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)