Vertigo (film) - Derivative Works

Derivative Works

High Anxiety, a 1977 film by Mel Brooks, is a parody of suspense films directed by Alfred Hitchcock, but leans on Vertigo in particular. The film was dedicated to Hitchcock, who sent Brooks a case containing six magnums of 1961 Château Haut-Brion wine, to show his appreciation.

Obsession, a 1976 film by Brian De Palma, is heavily influenced by Vertigo. Additionally, Body Double, a 1984 De Palma film, co-opts plot elements from Vertigo, as well as from Hitchcock's 1954 film Rear Window.

Sledge Hammer!, the mid-1980s American satirical police TV sitcom, featured an episode called "Vertical," which mirrored plot elements and motifs of Vertigo.

The Vertigo Murders, a 2000 novel by J. Madison Davis, is a detective story with Hitchcock as a character, set during the filming of Vertigo. Kim Novak and Jimmy Stewart appear as themselves within the story.

To Kill For, a 2008 play by Lucy Gray, is a biographical fantasy in which Hitchcock and his wife interact with the characters from Vertigo.

The Testament of Judith Barton, a 2012 novel by Wendy Powers & Robin McLeod, tells the back-story of Kim Novak's character. The novel creates a life for Judy Barton that foreshadows and motivates her involvement in the plot of the film.

The video for Faith No More's song "Last Cup of Sorrow" uses Vertigo as a template, squeezing the movie's highlights into the length of a rock song, using the band as the cast of this mini remake. The video captures the look and feel of the movie, while treating some of its scenes with a great deal of humor.

Harvey Danger's song Carlotta Valdez from their album Where Have All the Merrymakers Gone? summarizes the plot of the film.

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