Vauxhall Astra - Popularity

Popularity

The MK1 Astra was a strong seller in the UK and quickly established itself as Britain's second most popular small family car, but was never able to match the runaway sales success of the Ford Escort.

The MK2 Astra was a bigger seller than its predecessor, though again it failed to match the Ford Escort in terms of sales success. It further widened the gap between Vauxhall and rival products from Austin Rover, although the combined sales of ARG's Rover 200 and Austin Maestro ranges were often at least a match for the Astra's total sales.

The MK3 Astra took Vauxhall from strength to strength in the small family car market, after almost seven years on sale - and further narrowed the gap with the Ford Escort.

The MK4 Astra was also a huge success, and by 2001 it was the second best selling car in Britain overall behind the Ford Focus. Combined sales of Opel and Vauxhall Astra G made it the 26th most popular car in the world with a total production of 3,799,015.

The MK5 has so far been the most successful version of the Astra. It was Britain's second-best selling car in 2005, 2006 and 2007, further narrowing the gap between itself and the market-leading Ford Focus.

In March 2009, nearly 2,500,000 Astras had been sold over five generations since its launch 30 years earlier, making it the fourth most popular car ever sold in Britain, Iwith 90,641 sold in 2009,

For 2010, it was Britain's second best selling new car with 80,646 sold. It was only outsold by the smaller Ford Fiesta, and finally managed to outsell the Ford Focus and end Ford's lead of the small family car market after 37 years. Sales were down to 62,575 in 2011, becoming the fifth most popular new car in Britain.

Read more about this topic:  Vauxhall Astra

Other articles related to "popularity":

Oishinbo - Reception
... In the 1980s Japan had an upsurge in popularity in the gurume movement, called the "gourmet boom." Iorie Brau, author of "Oishinbo’s Adventures in Eating Food ... The popularity of Oishinbo the comic lead to the development of the anime, the live action film, and many fansites ...
Andy Fletcher (musician) - Career - Depeche Mode - Popularity
... Despite the barracking, Fletcher is said to be an integral component of modern day Depeche, and plays a number of major synthesised chords during live shows, the more complex arrangements being assigned to Peter Gordeno, who has been with the band ever since keyboardist Alan Wilder departed in 1995 ... When Wilder joined the band in early 1982, Fletcher had begun to take on the role of a manager and in the convening years, his musical input has been limited to contributing generic ideas to preformulated Gore/Gahan songs ...
Italian Given Names - Popularity Distribution of Given Names
... The popularity (frequency) distribution of given names typically follows a power law distribution ... the popularity distribution of given names has been shifting so that the most popular names are losing popularity ...
Effects - In The Workplace - Leadership Popularity
... there is no correlation between leadership and popularity however, when a group is cohesive, the higher up someone is in the leadership hierarchy, the more popular they are for two reasons ... view the leader more favorably and he gains popularity ... group morals and standards leads to high positive valuation from the group, leading to popularity ...

Famous quotes containing the word popularity:

    In everything from athletic ability to popularity to looks, brains, and clothes, children rank themselves against others. At this age [7 and 8], children can tell you with amazing accuracy who has the coolest clothes, who tells the biggest lies, who is the best reader, who runs the fastest, and who is the most popular boy in the third grade.
    Stanley I. Greenspan (20th century)

    There are few cases in which mere popularity should be considered a proper test of merit; but the case of song-writing is, I think, one of the few.
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809–1845)

    A more problematic example is the parallel between the increasingly abstract and insubstantial picture of the physical universe which modern physics has given us and the popularity of abstract and non-representational forms of art and poetry. In each case the representation of reality is increasingly removed from the picture which is immediately presented to us by our senses.
    Harvey Brooks (b. 1915)