Vanoise Massif - Principal Summits

Principal Summits

The principal summits of the Vanoise massif are:

  • Grande Casse, 3,855 m,
  • Mont Pourri, 3,779 m
  • Dent Parrachée, 3,697 m
  • Grande Motte, 3,653 m
  • Pointe de la Fournache, 3,639 m
  • Dôme de la Sache, 3,601 m
  • Dôme de l'Arpont, 3,599 m
  • Dômes de la Vanoise, 3,586 m
  • Dôme de Chasseforêt, 3,586 m
  • Grand Roc Noir, 3,582 m
  • Dôme des Nants, 3,570 m
  • Aiguille de Péclet 3,561 m
  • Mont Turia, 3,550 m
  • Aiguille de Polset, 3,534 m
  • Mont de Gébroulaz, 3,511 m
  • Pointes du Châtelard 3,479 m
  • Dôme des Platières, 3,473 m
  • Roc des Saints Pères, 3,470 m
  • Pointe de la Sana, 3,436 m
  • Pointe de l'Échelle, 3,422 m
  • Pointe du Bouchet, 3,420 m
  • Bellecôte, 3,417 m
  • Grand Bec, 3,398 m
  • Pointe du Vallonnet, 3,372 m
  • Pointe Rénod, 3,368 m
  • Dôme des Sonnailles, 3,361 m
  • Pointe de Claret, 3,355 m
  • Pointe de Méan Martin, 3,330 m
  • Dôme de Polset, 3,326 m
  • Dôme des Pichères, 3,319 m
  • Grand Roc, 3,316 m
  • Roche Chevrière, 3,281 m
  • Pointe de Thorens, 3,266 m
  • Mont Pelve, 3,261 m
  • Épaule du Bouchet, 3,250 m
  • Pointe des Buffettes, 3,233 m
  • Aiguille Rouge, 3,227 m
  • Pointe de la Réchasse, 3,212 m
  • Pointe du Dard, 3,206 m
  • Aiguille de la Vanoise, 2,796 m

Read more about this topic:  Vanoise Massif

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