Valuable Metals

Some articles on valuable metals, metals, metal, valuable metal, valuable:

Extractive Metallurgy
... metallurgy is the practice of removing valuable metals from an ore and refining the extracted raw metals into a purer form ... In order to convert a metal oxide or sulfide to a purer metal, the ore must be reduced physically, chemically, or electrolytically ... Extractive metallurgists are interested in three primary streams feed, concentrate (valuable metal oxide/sulfide), and tailings (waste) ...
Erhardt V. Boaro, (113 U.S. 527)
... while searching, on behalf of himself and the plaintiff, also a citizen, for valuable deposits of mineral, discovered, on vacant unoccupied land of the public domain ... any title to the premises until the working of the claim by the defendants had shown it to be valuable ... mineral lands to exploration for the precious metals, and, as a reward to the successful explorer, grants to him the right to extract and possess the mineral within certain prescribed limits ...
Metallurgy - Extraction
... metallurgy is the practice of removing valuable metals from an ore and refining the extracted raw metals into a purer form ... In order to convert a metal oxide or sulfide to a purer metal, the ore must be reduced physically, chemically, or electrolytically ... in three primary streams feed, concentrate (valuable metal oxide/sulfide), and tailings (waste) ...

Famous quotes containing the words metals and/or valuable:

    When human beings have been fascinated by the contemplation of their own hearts, the more intricate biological pattern of the female has become a model for the artist, the mystic, and the saint. When mankind turns instead to what can be done, altered, built, invented, in the outer world, all natural properties of men, animals, or metals become handicaps to be altered rather than clues to be followed.
    Margaret Mead (1901–1978)

    All schools, all colleges, have two great functions; to confer, and to conceal, valuable knowledge. The theological knowledge which they conceal cannot justly be regarded as less valuable than that which they reveal. That is, when a man is buying a basket of strawberries it can profit him to know that the bottom half of it is rotten.
    Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835–1910)