United States Five-dollar Bill

The United States five-dollar bill or fiver ($5) is a denomination of United States currency. The current $5 bill features U.S. President Abraham Lincoln's portrait on the front and the Lincoln Memorial on the back. All $5 bills issued today are Federal Reserve Notes. Five dollar bills are delivered by Federal Reserve Banks in red straps of 100 bills each.

The $5 bill is sometimes nicknamed a "fin". The term has Roman roots based on Roman numeral 'V' and is remotely related to the English "five", but it is far less common today than it was in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

The Bureau of Engraving and Printing says the average life of a $5 bill in circulation is 16 months before it is replaced due to wear. Approximately 6% of all paper currency produced by the U.S. Treasury's Bureau of Engraving and Printing in 2009 were $5 bills.

Read more about United States Five-dollar Bill21st Century Design, Large Size Note History, Small Size Note History, Reverse Side

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United States Five-dollar Bill - Reverse Side
... The back of the five-dollar bill features sections of the bill that are blanked out when viewed in the infrared spectrum ...

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