United Nations Economic Commission For Europe

The United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE or ECE) was established in 1947 to encourage economic cooperation among its member states. It is one of five regional commissions under the administrative direction of United Nations headquarters. It has 56 member states, and reports to the UN Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC). As well as countries in Europe, it includes Canada, the Central Asian republics, Israel and the United States of America. The UNECE secretariat headquarters is in Geneva, Switzerland, and has an approximate budget of US$50 million.

Read more about United Nations Economic Commission For Europe:  Member States, Committee On Economic Cooperation and Integration, Committee On Environmental Policy, Committee On Housing and Land Management, Inland Transport Committee, Conference of European Statisticians

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United Nations Economic Commission For Europe - Conference of European Statisticians
1) Free on-line data on the 56 UNECE member countries in Europe, Central Asia and North America in both English and Russian, on economic, gender, forestry and transport ...

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