Twelve-step Program

A twelve-step program is a set of guiding principles (accepted by members as 'spiritual principles,' based on the approved literature) outlining a course of action for recovery from addiction, compulsion, or other behavioral problems. Originally proposed by Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) as a method of recovery from alcoholism, the Twelve Steps were first published in the book Alcoholics Anonymous: The Story of How More Than One Hundred Men Have Recovered from Alcoholism in 1939. The method was then adapted and became the foundation of other twelve-step programs. As summarized by the American Psychological Association, the process involves the following:

  • admitting that one cannot control one's addiction or compulsion;
  • recognizing a higher power that can give strength;
  • examining past errors with the help of a sponsor (experienced member);
  • making amends for these errors;
  • learning to live a new life with a new code of behavior;
  • helping others who suffer from the same addictions or compulsions.

Read more about Twelve-step Program:  Overview, History, Twelve Steps, Twelve Traditions, Process, Sponsorship, Effectiveness, Criticism

Other articles related to "programs":

Twelve-step Program - Criticism - Cultural Identity
... One review of the twelve-step programs warned of detrimental iatrogenic effects of twelve-step philosophy and labeled the organizations as cults ... while another review asserts that these programs bore little semblance to religious cults and that the techniques used appeared beneficial to some ... Another study found that a twelve-step program's focus on self-admission of having a problem increases deviant stigma and strips members of their previous cultural identity replacing it ...

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