TV Week - History

History

The first issue to published covered the week 5 - 11 December 1957, with popular GTV-9 performers Geoff Corke and Val Ruff featured upon the cover. In 1958, the title was shortened to TV Week and circulation expanded to Sydney, then the only other TV market in Australia, in June. At the close of that year, Melbourne readers of TV Week were invited to vote for their favourite TV personalities and programmes. Graham Kennedy and Panda Lisner from GTV's In Melbourne Tonight were voted Melbourne's most popular TV personalities. Kennedy then named the awards the Logies, after the inventor of the first working television system, John Logie Baird. By June 1958, TV Week had a competitor, TV Times, published by the Australian Broadcasting Commission (ABC). TV Week continued to expand publication as television launched in other capital cities and regional areas across Australia.

The magazine introduced colour internal pages in 1962, moving to gloss colour covers and internal pages in 1967. As a final evolutionary stage, the magazine doubled size from A5 to A4 in July 1968.

In 1980, TV Week merged with rival publications TV Times and the Australian version of TV Guide. The revamped publication continued to be known as TV Week, and was now a joint venture between Kerry Packer's Australian Consolidated Press (who had bought out the former TV Times from the ABC) and Southdown Press (later Pacific Publications), with the latter publishing the magazine on behalf of both parties. In 2002, Packer effectively bought TV Week out of the joint venture. A legal battle over the custody of the magazines Logie Awards followed as both Australian Consolidated Press and Pacific Publications claimed ownership. Pacific wanted to use the Logies to promote their new rival TV listing What's On Weekly. Packer won the battle and the Logies remain connected to TV Week.

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