Tulane Stadium

Tulane Stadium was an outdoor football stadium located in New Orleans from 1926 to 1980. Officially known as the Third Tulane Stadium, it replaced the "Second Tulane Stadium" where the Telephone Exchange Building is now located. The former site is currently bound by Willow Street to the south, Ben Weiner Drive to the east, the Tulane University property line west of McAlister Place, and the Hertz Basketball/Volleyball Practice Facility and the George G. “Sunny” Westfeldt Practice and Competition Facility to the north.

The stadium hosted three of the first nine Super Bowls in 1970, 1972, and 1975.

Other articles related to "tulane stadium, stadium, tulane, stadiums":

Tulane Green Wave Football - History - Tulane Stadium
1926 saw the completion of a new stadium on campus, Tulane Stadium ... Tulane's third and fourth perfect regular seasons came in 1929 and 1931, with a single loss to Northwestern in Chicago, Illinois marring the 1930 campaign ... In 1932 Tulane joined the Southeastern Conference as a charter member ...
Tulane Stadium - History - Demolition
... On November 2, 1979, Tulane President Sheldon Hackney announced that the stadium would be demolished ... the storage areas underneath the seating in the stadium were being emptied prior to demolition, various neglected University possessions were rediscovered, including an Ancient Egyptian mummy ... Tulane Stadium is one of three stadiums that had hosted a Super Bowl that are no longer standing ...
New Orlean Saints - Logos and Uniforms
... The Saints predominantly wore white at home when the club played at Tulane Stadium from 1967 through 1974 (except in 1969 and 1970), forcing opponents to wear dark colors in the ... When the surface at Tulane Stadium switched from natural grass to PolyTurf in 1971, field temperatures became hotter still ... to white pants in 1975, coinciding with the team's move from Tulane Stadium to the Superdome, and have worn white at home numerous times since then ...

Famous quotes containing the words stadium and/or tulane:

    The final upshot of thinking is the exercise of volition, and of this thought no longer forms a part; but belief is only a stadium of mental action, an effect upon our nature due to thought, which will influence future thinking.
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