Tsim Sha Tsui - Industry

Industry

Tsim Sha Tsui remains tertiary sector from colonial days to present. In early colonial days, transport, tourism and trading are main business of the area. As port and rail facilities moved out of the area, the major industry falls on the later two. Tsim Sha Tsui, like Central, contains several centers of finance. After Kai Tak Airport closed, the height restrictions on buildings has dropped and now larger taller skyscrapers, parallel to those of central are in the beginning stages of development in the area.

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Other articles related to "industry":

Royal Society Of Arts - The RSA's Worldwide Presence Today - Projects
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