Treating

Treating, in law, is the act of serving food, drink, and other refreshments to influence people for political gain. In various countries, treating is considered a form of corruption, and is illegal as such.

Treating, in a social context, came about with the birth of leisure time in the late nineteenth century. Young working class women took pride in going out and enjoying the city’s “cheap amusements”. Some notable cheap amusements included public dances, amusement parks, and nickelodeon movie theatres. Although young working class women liked to go out, this often proved difficult, as their wages were very low. Young women dealt with this issue in numerous ways. Some refrained from going out or limited going out to special occasions, while others depended on their male counterparts to finance their pleasures. The latter solution is referred to as “treating”. Historian Kathy Peiss has popularized this term in many of her scholarly works such as Cheap Amusements: Working Women and Leisure in Turn-of-the-Century New York (1986) and “Charity Girls and City Pleasures” (2004). The act of treating was an exchange between a man and a woman. A man would agree to pay for a woman’s outing in exchange for her company. Treating ranged from the more innocent to the more scandalous. Treating was seen as harmless when it was conducted between a “steady” couple and more risqué when it was performed on a casual basis. The women who engaged with this more risqué form of treating often reciprocated by performing sexual favors. These favors could be dancing, hugging, and kissing to full on sexual intercourse. The women who engaged with the more intense sexual acts were referred to as “charity girls”. These women did not see themselves as prostitutes but often walked a fine line between being treated and being paid for their sexual services.

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Annona Senegalensis - Uses
... Bark can be processed to produce yellow-brown dye, insecticide, or medicine for treating a wide array of ailments, including worms parasitic on the intestines ... Roots are also used medicinally in treating a gamut of conditions, from dizziness and indigestion to chest colds to venereal diseases ... senegalensis are used in treating skin or eye disorders ...
Antihecticum Poterii
... It was used in treating heaviness of the head, giddiness, and dimness of sight, which proceeded apoplexies and epilepsies ... In treating all afflictions and foulnesses of the viscera of the lower belly, it was believed inferior to nothing for example, in treating jaundice, dropsies, and other mal-nutritione ... It was regarded as superior in treating even the most obstinate chronic distemper (disturbance of the humour) ...
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... key works in the history of Indian philosophy, including the Kamasutra of Vātsyāyana (treating kāma, particularly as "sexual gratification"), the ...
Treating Survivors Of Satanist Abuse
... Treating Survivors of Satanist Abuse is a collection of essays edited by Valerie Sinason addressing the treatment of those who allege they are survivors of Satanic ritual abuse (a ... scepticism about the phenomenon and ethical issues related to treating individuals reporting satanic ritual abuse ...

Famous quotes containing the word treating:

    There is something antique, even, in his style of treating his subject, reminding us that Heroes and Demi-gods, Fates and Furies, still exist; the common man is nothing to him, but after death the hero is apotheosized and has a place in heaven, as in the religion of the Greeks.
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    To a first approximation, the intentional strategy consists of treating the object whose behavior you want to predict as a rational agent with beliefs and desires and other mental states exhibiting what Brentano and others call intentionality.
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    Permissiveness is the principle of treating children as if they were adults; and the tactic of making sure they never reach that stage.
    Thomas Szasz (b. 1920)