Tranexamic Acid - Medical Uses

Medical Uses

Tranexamic acid is frequently used in surgeries with high risk of blood loss such as cardiac, liver, vascular and large orthopedic procedures. Its oral form is now being evaluated for use in outpatient conditions involving heavy bleeding.

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