Tobin Bell

Tobin Bell (born Joseph Henry Tobin, Jr.; August 7, 1942) is an American film and television character actor, best known for his portrayal of John Kramer/Jigsaw of the Saw film series. After years of work doing stand-ins and background work on films, he got his first major acting job in Mississippi Burning (1988) and went on to star in made-for-television films and guest star in television shows throughout the 1990s.

A life member of The Actors Studio, Bell is best known as the villain John Kramer/Jigsaw of the Saw film series and is one of two actors to appear in all seven films, along with Shawnee Smith. He provided his voice in two video games based on the films, Saw and its sequel, Saw II: Flesh & Blood, in which he also provided his likeness. Bell's portrayal of Jigsaw has earned him five award nominations and two wins.

Read more about Tobin BellEarly Life, Personal Life, Filmography, Awards, Further Reading

Other articles related to "tobin bell, bell":

Amanda Young - Shawnee Smith
... part of the movie, not because Shawnee Smith can match the creepy gravitas of Tobin Bell.. ... A film critic for the website Angel Fire concurred that Tobin Bell and Shawnee Smith performed very well in their roles ... the third film, he went on to claim that "while Bell's Jigsaw played a major role in Saw III, most of the film is carried along by Shawnee Smith as Amanda" whom he believed presented an "interesting ...
Saw II - Reception - Accolades
... Tobin Bell was nominated for "Best Villain" at the 2006 MTV Movie Awards for his role as Jigsaw, though the award went to Hayden Christensen for his role in Star Wars ... Smith Nominated Fangoria Chainsaw Awards Best Villain Tobin Bell Won MTV Movie Awards Best Villain Tobin Bell Nominated Saturn Award Best DVD Special Edition Release — Nominated Best Horror Film ...

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    In 1862 the congregation of the church forwarded the church bell to General Beauregard to be melted into cannon, “hoping that its gentle tones, that have so often called us to the House of God, may be transmuted into war’s resounding rhyme to repel the ruthless invader from the beautiful land God, in his goodness, has given us.”
    —Federal Writers’ Project Of The Wor, U.S. public relief program (1935-1943)