Tinker Bell - in Film

In Film

Film adaptations provided the first vocal effects for the character, whether through sound—such as musical expressions or the sound of a tinkling bell—or human speech. She was played by Virginia Browne Faire in Herbert Brenon's 1924 version of Peter Pan, Julia Roberts in 1991's Hook, and by Ludivine Sagnier in P.J. Hogan's 2003 adaptation, which originally planned to use a computer-generated version of the character, but instead used Sagnier in combinations with digital models and effects to take advantage of the actress's expressions. Tinker Bell was voiced by Debi Derryberry in the 1990 Fox animated program Peter Pan and the Pirates, and by Sumi Shimamoto in the 1989 anime series The Adventures of Peter Pan.

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