Tim Winton - Literary Career

Literary Career

Whilst at Curtin University of Technology, Winton wrote his first novel, An Open Swimmer, which won The Australian/Vogel Literary Award in 1981, launching his writing career. He has stated that he wrote "the best part of three books while at university". His second book, Shallows, won the Miles Franklin Award in 1984. It wasn't until Cloudstreet was published in 1991, however, that his writing career was properly established. His latest novel, Breath, was published in 2008.

Read more about this topic:  Tim Winton

Other articles related to "literary career, literary, careers, career":

Adriano González León - Biography - Literary Career
... He was a collaborator on the literary magazine, Letra Roja (Red Letter) and in a group of painters, sculptors, and writers, El Techo de la Ballena (The Roof of the Whale) ...
Edward L. Beach, Sr. - Biography - Literary Career
... first printed in the years of 1907 to 1922, were instrumental in planting the seeds for naval careers in the minds of many of the men who served as naval officers during World War II ... who was also a career naval officer and author ...
Lesław Bartelski - Literary Career
... After the war, Bartelski studied law at Warsaw University, and began a writing career ... Over his career, he won numerous awards for his work, including the Prize of Minister of Defense (2nd class) in 1969, Pietrzak Prize in 1969 and 1985, Warsaw Prize in 1969, Prize of Minister Culture and Art (1st ...

Famous quotes containing the words career and/or literary:

    What exacerbates the strain in the working class is the absence of money to pay for services they need, economic insecurity, poor daycare, and lack of dignity and boredom in each partner’s job. What exacerbates it in upper-middle class is the instability of paid help and the enormous demands of the career system in which both partners become willing believers. But the tug between traditional and egalitarian models of marriage runs from top to bottom of the class ladder.
    Arlie Hochschild (20th century)

    A literary woman’s best critic is her husband ...
    Elizabeth Stuart Phelps (1844–1911)