The Ren & Stimpy Show - Adult Party Cartoon (2003–2004)

Adult Party Cartoon (2003–2004)

In 2003, Kricfalusi relaunched the series as Ren & Stimpy "Adult Party Cartoon". The new version was aired during a late night programming block on Spike TV and was rated TV-MA. The series, as the title implies, explores more adult themes, including an explicitly homosexual relationship between the main characters, and an episode filled with female nudity. Billy West declined to reprise his role as the voice of Stimpy, saying that the show was "not funny" and that joining it would have damaged his career. Eric Bauza voiced Stimpy, while Kricfalusi reprised the role of Ren. The show began with the "banned" Nickelodeon episode "Man's Best Friend" before debuting new episodes. Fans and critics alike were unsettled by the show from the first episode, which featured the consumption of bodily fluids such as nasal mucus, saliva and vomit. Only three of the ordered nine episodes were produced on time. After three episodes, the entire animation block was removed from Spike TV's programming schedule.

Read more about this topic:  show">The Ren & Stimpy Show

Other articles related to "adult, cartoon":

The Ren & Stimpy Show - Adult Party Cartoon (2003–2004)
... In 2003, Kricfalusi relaunched the series as Ren Stimpy "AdultParty Cartoon ... The series, as the title implies, explores more adultthemes, including an explicitly homosexual relationship between the main characters, and an episode filled with ...

Famous quotes containing the words cartoon, party and/or adult:

    this cartoon by Raphael for a tapestry for a Pope:
    Elizabeth Bishop (1911–1979)

    When anyone apologizes to us he has to do it very expertly: otherwise we might easily come to see ourselves as the guilty party and experience unpleasant feelings.
    Friedrich Nietzsche (1844–1900)

    The confusion of emotions with behavior causes no end of unnecessary trouble to both adults and children. Behavior can be commanded; emotions can’t. An adult can put controls on a child’s behavior—at least part of the time—but how do you put controls on what a child feels? An adult can impose controls on his own behavior—if he’s grown up—but how does he order what he feels?
    Leontine Young (20th century)