The Real World: Los Angeles

The Real World: California (retrospectively referred to as The Real World: Los Angeles, to distinguish it from subsequent installments of the series) is the second season of MTV's reality television series The Real World, which focuses on a group of several diverse strangers living together for several months, as the cameras follow their lives and interpersonal relationships.

The Los Angeles season featured a total of nine cast members over the course of the season, as one cast member was evicted and replaced, and another was replaced when she got married. The Real World expanded from 13 to 21 episodes with this season.

The season, which documented 22 weeks of the cast's interactions, began with two cast members being flown to Nashville and then spending ten days driving cross country to Venice Beach in a Winnebago, picking up a third cast member in Owensboro, Kentucky along the way.

Read more about The Real World: Los AngelesSeason Changes, The Residence, Cast, Episodes, Media References, After Filming

Famous quotes containing the words los angeles, angeles, los and/or real:

    Los Angeles is a Yukon for crime-story writers.
    Christina Stead (1902–1983)

    In Washington, the first thing people tell you is what their job is. In Los Angeles you learn their star sign. In Houston you’re told how rich they are. And in New York they tell you what their rent is.
    Simon Hoggart (b. 1946)

    It is hereby earnestly proposed that the USA would be much better off if that big, sprawling, incoherent, shapeless, slobbering civic idiot in the family of American communities, the City of Los Angeles, could be declared incompetent and placed in charge of a guardian like any individual mental defective.
    Westbrook Pegler (1894–1969)

    The mother must teach her son how to respect and follow the rules. She must teach him how to compete successfully with the other boys. And she must teach him how to find a woman to take care of him and finish the job she began of training him how to live in a family. But no matter how good a job a woman does in teaching a boy how to be a man, he knows that she is not the real thing, and so he tends to exaggerate the differences between men and women that she embodies.
    Frank Pittman (20th century)