The Postman Always Rings Twice - Plot

Plot

The story is narrated in the first person by Frank Chambers, a young drifter who stops at a rural California diner for a meal, and ends up working there. The diner is operated by a young, beautiful woman, Cora, and her much older husband, Nick Papadakis, sometimes called "the Greek".

There is an immediate attraction between Frank and Cora, and they begin a passionate affair with sadomasochistic qualities (when they first embrace, Cora commands Frank to bite her lip, and Frank does so hard enough to draw blood).

Cora, a femme fatale figure, is tired of her situation, married to a man she does not love, and working at a diner that she wishes to own and improve. Frank and Cora scheme to murder the Greek in order to start a new life together without Cora losing the diner.

They plan on striking Nick's head and making it seem he fell and drowned in the bathtub. Cora fells Nick with a solid blow, but, due to a sudden power outage and the appearance of a policeman, the scheme fails. Nick recovers and because of retrograde amnesia does not suspect that he narrowly avoided being killed.

Determined to kill Nick, Frank and Cora fake a car accident. They ply Nick with wine, strike him on the head, and crash the car. Frank and Cora are injured. The local prosecutor suspects what has actually occurred, but doesn't have enough evidence to prove it. As a tactic intended to get Cora and Frank to turn on one another, he charges only Cora with the crime of Nick's murder, coercing Frank to sign a complaint against her. Cora, furious and indignant, insists upon offering a full confession detailing both their roles. Her lawyer tricks her into dictating that confession to a member of his own staff. Cora, believing her confession made, returns to prison. Though Cora would be sure to learn of the trickery, a few valuable hours are gained. The lawyer uses the time to manipulate those financially interested in the trial to have their private detective recant his testimony, which was the final remaining weapon in the prosecution's arsenal. The state is forced to grant Cora a plea agreement, under which she is given a suspended sentence and no jail time.

Frank and Cora patch things up and plan a happy-family future. Then Cora is killed in a car accident while Frank is driving. The book ends with Frank, from death row, summarizing the events that followed, explaining that he was wrongly convicted of having murdered Cora. The text, he hopes, will be published after his execution.

Read more about this topic:  The Postman Always Rings Twice

Other articles related to "plot, plots":

Bresenham's Line Algorithm - Derivation - Algorithm
... plot(x0,y0, x1,y1) dx=x1-x0 dy=y1-y0 D = 2*dy - dx plot(x0,y0) y=y0 for x from x0+1 to x1 if D > 0 y = y+1 plot(x,y) D = D + (2*dy-2*dx) else plot(x,y) D = D + (2*dy) Running this algorithm ...
Babington Plot - Mary's Imprisonment
... her abdication from the throne of Scotland in 1567, she became the focus of numerous plots and intrigues to restore England to the Catholic fold ... against the queen, even if the claimant were ignorant of the plot, would be excluded from the line and executed ... who would benefit from the death of the Queen if a plot against her was discovered ...
Zoltan, Hound Of Dracula (film) - Plot
... Zoltan opens another coffin shaken loose from the crypt, this one holding the body of an innkeeper, Nalder, who once owned the crypt ... Zoltan removes the stake from the innkeeper's chest, reanimating the innkeeper ...
Les Misérables - Plot - Volume II – Cosette
... Valjean arrives at Montfermeil on Christmas Eve ... He finds Cosette fetching water in the woods alone and walks with her to the inn ...
Q-Q Plot - Interpretation
... The points plotted in a Q–Q plot are always non-decreasing when viewed from left to right ... If the two distributions being compared are identical, the Q–Q plot follows the 45° line y = x ... after linearly transforming the values in one of the distributions, then the Q–Q plot follows some line, but not necessarily the line y = x ...

Famous quotes containing the word plot:

    The westward march has stopped, upon the final plains of the Pacific; and now the plot thickens ... with the change, the pause, the settlement, our people draw into closer groups, stand face to face, to know each other and be known.
    Woodrow Wilson (1856–1924)

    The plot was most interesting. It belonged to no particular age, people, or country, and was perhaps the more delightful on that account, as nobody’s previous information could afford the remotest glimmering of what would ever come of it.
    Charles Dickens (1812–1870)

    Those blessed structures, plot and rhyme—
    why are they no help to me now
    I want to make
    something imagined, not recalled?
    Robert Lowell (1917–1977)