The Beatles (album) - Editing Concerns and Release

Editing Concerns and Release

The Beatles was the first Beatles album released by Apple Records, as well as their only original double album. Producer George Martin has said that he was against the idea of a double album at the time and suggested to the group that they reduce the number of songs in order to form a single album featuring their stronger work, but that the band decided against this. Interviewed for the Beatles Anthology, Starr said that he now felt that it should have been released as two separate albums (that he appropriately named The White Album and The Whiter Album). Harrison felt on reflection that some of the tracks could have been released as B-sides, but "there was a lot of ego in that band". He also supported the idea of the double album, to clear out the backlog of songs that the group had at the time. McCartney, by contrast, said that it was fine as it was ("It's great. It sold. It's the bloody Beatles White Album. Shut up."), and that its wide variety of songs was a major part of the album's appeal. The Beatles was released on 22 November 1968.

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Other articles related to "editing concerns and release, releases, release":

The Beatles (album) - Editing Concerns and Release - Sleeve
... Later vinyl record releases in the US showed the title in grey printed (rather than embossed) letters ... Later CD releases rendered the album's title in black or grey ... The 30th anniversary CD release was done to look like the original album sleeve, with an embossed title and serial number, including a small reproduction of the poster and pictures (see re-issues) ...

Famous quotes containing the words release, editing and/or concerns:

    If I were to be taken hostage, I would not plead for release nor would I want my government to be blackmailed. I think certain government officials, industrialists and celebrated persons should make it clear they are prepared to be sacrificed if taken hostage. If that were done, what gain would there be for terrorists in taking hostages?
    Margaret Mead (1901–1978)

    In this century the writer has carried on a conversation with madness. We might almost say of the twentieth-century writer that he aspires to madness. Some have made it, of course, and they hold special places in our regard. To a writer, madness is a final distillation of self, a final editing down. It’s the drowning out of false voices.
    Don Delillo (b. 1926)

    I have no doubt that it was a principle they fought for, as much as our ancestors, and not to avoid a three-penny tax on their tea; and the results of this battle will be as important and memorable to those whom it concerns as those of the battle of Bunker Hill, at least.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)