Ten Feet Tall

Some articles on feet, ten feet tall:

Nine-point Circle - Significant Nine Points
... Points G, H, and I are the feet of the altitudes of the triangle ... For an acute triangle, six of the points (the midpoints and altitude feet) lie on the triangle itself for an obtuse triangle two of the altitudes have feet outside the triangle, but these feet still ...
Confederate Memorial Gates In Mayfield
... The main pair are each two feet wide and ten feet tall, with 27 feet between them ... The center pair has no road between them they are three feet wide, ten feet tall, and 285 feet away from the main gates ... The third set are 330 feet away from the center gates, two feet wide and ten feet tall ...
Passes Of The Silvretta And Rätikon Ranges
... Guarda to Galtur Snow 0 meters 112 ... feet Fuorcla del Confin Silvretta Pass to the Vermunt Glacier Snow 3058 meters 10,033 feet Buinlucke Guarda to Patenen ...
USS Scamp (SS-277) - Seventh War Patrol
... She dived and the destroyers passed overhead without noticing her presence a scant 10 feet (3.0 m) below the surface ... All hands were knocked off their feet by the explosion and all power was lost ... At just below 300 feet (91 m), she began to hang on, then started up ...
Mountain West Conference - Elevation - Elevation By Conference
... Conference Average campus elevation Mountain West 3,473 feet (2012), 3,650 feet (2013) Big Sky 2,968 feet WAC 1,967 feet Summit League 1,295 feet Pac 12 1,205 feet Elevation data ...

Famous quotes containing the words tall, ten and/or feet:

    The daily arguments over putting away the toys or practicing the piano defeat us so easily. We see them coming yet they frustrate us time and time again. In many cases, we are mothers and fathers who have managed budgets and unruly bosses and done difficult jobs well through sheer tenacity and dogged preparation. So why are we unable to persuade someone three feet tall to step into six inches of water at bathtime?
    Cathy Rindner Tempelsman (20th century)

    And ten low words oft creep in one dull line:
    Alexander Pope (1688–1744)

    For nature, heartless, witless nature,
    Will neither care nor know
    What stranger’s feet may find the meadow
    And trespass there and go,
    Nor ask amid the dews of morning
    If they are mine or no.
    —A.E. (Alfred Edward)