Teletype

Teletype

The Teletype Corporation, a part of American Telephone and Telegraph Company's Western Electric manufacturing arm since 1930, came into being in 1928 when the Morkrum-Kleinschmidt Company changed its name to the name of its trademark equipment. Teletype Corporation, of Skokie, Illinois, was responsible for the research, development and manufacture of data and record communications equipment, but it is primarily remembered for the manufacture of electromechanical teleprinters.

Because of the nature of its business, as stated in the corporate charter, Teletype Corporation was allowed a unique mode of operation within Western Electric. It was organized as a separate entity, and contained all the elements necessary for a separate corporation. Teletype's charter permitted the sale of equipment to customers outside the AT&T Bell System, which explained their need for a separate sales force. The primary customer outside of the Bell System was the United States Government.

The Teletype Corporation continued in this manner until January 8, 1982, the date of settlement of United States v. AT&T, a 1974 United States Department of Justice antitrust suit against AT&T. At that time, Western Electric was fully absorbed into AT&T as AT&T Technologies, and the Teletype Corporation became AT&T Teletype. The last vestiges of what had been the Teletype Corporation ceased in 1990, bringing to a close the dedicated teleprinter business.

Read more about Teletype:  History, Historical Impact

Other articles related to "teletype":

Teletype - Historical Impact
... text to an operating system's standard output is called "printing", from when Teletype machines were used to physically print a program's output ... programming language BASIC was designed to be written and edited on a low-speed Teletype Model 33 ... The slow speed of the Teletype Model 33 influenced the user interface of minicomputer operating systems, including UNIX ...
Teletype Corporation - Historical Impact
... sending text to an operating system's standard output is called "printing", from when Teletype machines were used to physically print a program's output ... designed to be written and edited on a low-speed Teletype Model 33 ... The slow speed of the Teletype Model 33 influenced the user interface of minicomputer operating systems, including UNIX ...