Supermassive Black Hole (song)

Supermassive Black Hole (song)

"Supermassive Black Hole" is a song by English alternative rock band Muse, featured on their fourth studio album Black Holes and Revelations. It was written by Muse lead singer and principal songwriter Matthew Bellamy. When released as the lead single from the album in June 2006, backed with "Crying Shame", the song charted at number four on the UK Singles Chart, the highest singles chart position the band has achieved to date in the United Kingdom. In October 2011, NME placed it at number 74 on its list "150 Best Tracks of the Past 15 Years". It was nominated for the Kerrang! Award for Best Single.

On 8 May 2008, the song was released as downloadable content for the rhythm game Guitar Hero III: Legends of Rock on the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360, along with "Stockholm Syndrome" and "Exo-Politics". The song was also used in the 2008 movie Twilight in the baseball game sequence, and subsequently was used in the soundtrack. A version of the song was also featured on FIFA 07's playlist, this version of the song contains a more distorted guitar. It is also the only Muse song to feature a distorted snarl. In 2006, it featured in the Supernatural episode "Hunted". It was also featured at the beginning of the Series 6 Doctor Who episode "The Rebel Flesh". It was also used as a wake-up for Space Shuttle Atlantis astronauts on the vessel's presumed final day in space, 26 May 2010.

The song was covered by UK progressive metal band Threshold on their 2007 album Dead Reckoning, as a bonus track.

Read more about Supermassive Black Hole (song):  Influences, Music Video, Reception, Release, Track Listings, Charts

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    Anna Quindlen (b. 1953)

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    Joycelyn Elders (b. 1933)