Substrate Binding

Some articles on substrate binding, binding, substrate, substrates:

Tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase - Enzyme Structure
... dimer of dimers because the N terminal residues of each monomer form part of the substrate binding site in an adjacent monomer ... are completely helical, and a flexible loop, involved in L-tryptophan binding, is observed just outside the active-site pocket ... Interestingly, this loop appears to be substrate-binding induced, as it is observed only in crystals grown in the presence of L-tryptophan ...
Enzyme Catalysis - Induced Fit - Catalysis By Induced Fit
... the stabilizing effect of strong enzyme binding ... There are two different mechanisms of substrate binding uniform binding, which has strong substrate binding, and differential binding, which has strong ... The stabilizing effect of uniform binding increases both substrate and transition state binding affinity, while differential binding increases only transition state binding ...
ATP-binding Cassette Transporter - Mechanism of Transport
... require energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to translocate substrates across cell membranes ... These proteins harness the energy of ATP binding and/or hydrolysis to drive conformational changes in the transmembrane domain (TMD) and consequently ... have a common mechanism in transporting substrates because of the similarities in their structures ...
Enzyme Inhibitor - Reversible Inhibitors - Quantitative Description of Reversible Inhibition
... can be described quantitatively in terms of the inhibitor's binding to the enzyme and to the enzyme–substrate complex, and its effects on the kinetic constants of the enzyme ... scheme below, an enzyme (E) binds to its substrate (S) to form the enzyme–substrate complex ES ... the inhibitor interferes with substrate binding), but does not affect Vmax (the inhibitor does not hamper catalysis in ES because it cannot bind to ES) ...

Famous quotes containing the word binding:

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