Stockholm Syndrome

Stockholm Syndrome

Stockholm syndrome, or capture-bonding, is a psychological phenomenon in which hostages express empathy, sympathy and have positive feelings towards their captors, sometimes to the point of defending them. These feelings are generally considered irrational in light of the danger or risk endured by the victims, who essentially mistake a lack of abuse from their captors for an act of kindness. The FBI’s Hostage Barricade Database System shows that roughly 27% of victims show evidence of Stockholm Syndrome.

Stockholm syndrome can be seen as a form of traumatic bonding, which does not necessarily require a hostage scenario, but which describes "strong emotional ties that develop between two persons where one person intermittently harasses, beats, threatens, abuses, or intimidates the other."

Battered-wife syndrome is an example of activating the capture-bonding psychological mechanism, as are military basic training and fraternity bonding by hazing.

Stockholm syndrome is sometimes erroneously referred to as the Helsinki syndrome.

Read more about Stockholm Syndrome:  History, Evolutionary Explanations, Notable Examples, In Economics, In Politics, Lima Syndrome

Other articles related to "stockholm syndrome, syndrome":

Stockholm Syndrome - Lima Syndrome
... An inverse of Stockholm syndrome called "Lima syndrome" has been proposed, in which abductors develop sympathy for their hostages ...

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