Stencil

A stencil is a thin sheet of material, such as paper, plastic, or metal, with letters or a design cut from it, used to produce the letters or design on an underlying surface by applying pigment through the cut-out holes in the material. The key advantage of a stencil is that it can be reused to repeatedly and rapidly produce the same letters or design. The design produced with a stencil is also called a stencil. The context in which stencil is used makes clear which meaning is intended. Although aerosol or painting stencils can be made for one-time use, typically they are made to be reusable. To be reusable, they must remain intact after a design is produced and the stencil is removed from the work surface. With some designs, this is done by connecting stencil islands (sections of material that are inside cut-out "holes" in the stencil) to other parts of the stencil with bridges (narrow sections of material that are not cut out).

Stencil technique in visual art is also referred to as pochoir. A related technique (which has found applicability in some surrealist compositions) is aerography, in which spray-painting is done around a three-dimensional object to create a negative of the object instead of a positive of a stencil design. This technique was used in cave paintings dating to 10,000 BC, where human hands were used in painting hand print outlines among paintings of animals and other objects. The artist sprayed pigment around his hand by using a hollow bone, blown by mouth to direct a stream of pigment.

Screen printing also uses a stencil process, as does mimeography. The masters from which mimeographed pages are printed are often called "stencils." Stencils can be made with one or many colour layers using different techniques, with most stencils designed to be applied as solid colours. During screen printing and mimeography the images for stenciling are broken down into color layers. Multiple layers of stencils are used on the same surface to produce multi-colored images.

Read more about Stencil:  History, Book Illustration, Aerosol Stencils, Home Stenciling, Military Stenciling, Silk Screening, Micro/nanostencil, Other Stencil Forms

Other articles related to "stencil, stencils":

Other Stencil Forms
... A stencil technique is employed in screen printing which uses a tightly woven mesh screen coated in a thin layer of emulsion to reproduce the ... As the stencil is attached to the screen, a contiguous template is not necessary ... A stencil used in airbrushing called a frisket is pressed directly on the artwork ...
Stencil (disambiguation)
... A stencil is a template used to draw or paint identical letters, symbols, shapes, or patterns every time it is used ... The design produced by such a template is also called a stencil ... It may also mean Stencil (typeface), a font Stencil (numerical analysis) ...
Stencil Lithography - Challenges
... there are still several challenges to be addressed by stencil lithography ... During deposition through the stencil, material is deposited not only on the substrate through the apertures but also on the stencil backside, including around and inside the ... The accuracy of the pattern transfer from the stencil to the substrate depends on many parameters ...
Sixten (street Artist) - Background
... Sixten did his first stencil in 1994 on a skateboard deck, but it wasn't until 2000 that he started doing stencils on the streets ... Sixten is one of the forces behind Stencil Revolution, a large websites devoted to street art ... The book Stencil Graffiti Capital devotes a chapter to Sixten ...
Stencil Lithography - Modes - Dynamic Stencil
... In the dynamic mode, the stencil moves relative to the substrate during deposition, allowing the fabrication of patterns with tapered height profiles by changing the stencil speed during a constant material deposition ...