Statement of Faith

A creed is a statement of belief, in particular a statement of faith that describes the beliefs shared by a religious community. Religious creeds are not intended to be comprehensive, but to be a summary of core beliefs. The term "creed" can also refer to a person's political or social beliefs, or is sometimes used to mean religious affiliation.

One of the most widely used creeds in Christianity is the Nicene Creed, first formulated in AD 325 at the First Council of Nicaea. It was based on Christian understanding of the Canonical Gospels, the letters of the New Testament and to a lesser extent the Old Testament. Affirmation of this creed, which describes the Trinity, is generally taken as a fundamental test of orthodoxy for most Christian denominations. The Apostles' Creed is also broadly accepted. Some Christian denominations and other groups have rejected the authority of those creeds.

Muslims declare the shahada, or testimony: "I bear witness that there is no god but (the One) God (Allah), and I bear witness that Muhammad is God's messenger."

Whether Judaism is creedal has been a point of some controversy. Although some say Judaism is noncreedal in nature, others say it recognizes a single creed, the Shema Yisrael, which begins: "Hear, O Israel: the LORD our God, the LORD is one."

Read more about Statement Of Faith:  Etymology, Terminology, Christian Creeds, Christian Confessions of Faith, Christians Without Creeds, Jewish Creed, Islamic Creed, See Also

Other articles related to "statement of faith":

Capernwray Harbour Bible School - Statement of Faith
... The Capernwray Statement of Faith asserts that God created man in such a way that the presence of God as Creator within a man as creature is imperative to his humanity ... the dead to live his life in us." The Statement of Faith also declares that once one has truly assumed the Christian life, "Christ can then do the work ...

Famous quotes containing the words statement of, faith and/or statement:

    Most personal correspondence of today consists of letters the first half of which are given over to an indexed statement of why the writer hasn’t written before, followed by one paragraph of small talk, with the remainder devoted to reasons why it is imperative that the letter be brought to a close.
    Robert Benchley (1889–1945)

    Those to whom God has imparted religion by feeling of the heart are very fortunate and are rightly convinced. But to those who do not have it, we can give it only by reasoning, waiting for God to give it by feeling of the heart—without which faith is only human and useless for salvation.
    Blaise Pascal (1623–1662)

    The new statement is always hated by the old, and, to those dwelling in the old, comes like an abyss of skepticism.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)