Standing Wheelchair - Types and Function

Types and Function

Standing wheelchairs can be either manually operated, have power-operated wheels but manual lifting mechanisms or be fully powered with, for example, hydraulic lifting mechanisms. They are used both to achieve regular mobility and to stand the person up using hydraulics or other power sources. Some standing wheelchairs may be driven from the standing position, however there is some medical concern of an increased risk of long bone fractures while driving due to the legs being under a heavy load.

Read more about this topic:  Standing Wheelchair

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