Space Wolves

Some articles on space, space wolves:

Space Marines (Warhammer 40,000) - Chapter Structure - Traitor Legions
... fled into the Eye of Terror, becoming the Chaos Space Marines ... Their forces feature many of the infamous Noise Marines - Chaos Space Marines armed with powerful and exotic sonic weaponry ... They are amongst the most organised of the Chaos Space Marines, still adhering to their pre-Heresy military doctrine, and also one of the most resilient, given the incredible resistance granted to ...
Black Library Gaming (Warhammer 40,000) - Novels and Short Fiction Line - Space Wolves - Warhammer 40,000 Gaming
... Ragnar Blackmane is a special character for the Space Wolves Space Marines army ... against the Thousand Sons Chaos Space Marine Madox ... Ragnar Blackmane, in the Space Wolves companion codex to the Space Marines army book, is a "Wolf Lord" ranked Space Marine ...
Deathwatch (Warhammer 40,000) - Chapter Structure - Loyalist Legions
... fast-attack doctrine, and makes extensive use of hit and run tactics using Space Marine bikes ... Space Wolves VI Leman Russ (The Wolf King) ... for the last battle, for the wolftime" Fenris Fenris (The Fang) The Space Wolves are fierce warriors with an organisation that differs strongly from other Chapters ...
Supreme Grand Master Azrael - Chapter Structure - Loyalist Legions
... use of heavy plasma-based weapons and the usual space marine weapon the bolter ... doctrine, and makes extensive use of hit and run tactics using Space Marine bikes ... Space Wolves VI Leman Russ (The Wolf King) ...

Famous quotes containing the words wolves and/or space:

    [Men say:] “Don’t you know that we are your natural protectors?” But what is a woman afraid of on a lonely road after dark? The bears and wolves are all gone; there is nothing to be afraid of now but our natural protectors.
    Frances A. Griffin, U.S. suffragist. As quoted in History of Woman Suffrage, vol. 4, ch. 19, by Susan B. Anthony and Ida Husted Harper (1902)

    The peculiarity of sculpture is that it creates a three-dimensional object in space. Painting may strive to give on a two-dimensional plane, the illusion of space, but it is space itself as a perceived quantity that becomes the peculiar concern of the sculptor. We may say that for the painter space is a luxury; for the sculptor it is a necessity.
    Sir Herbert Read (1893–1968)