Space Science Fiction Magazine

Space Science Fiction Magazine was a US science fiction magazine published by Republic Features Syndicate, Inc. as part of a package of radio shows and related genre magazines. Two issues appeared, both in 1957. It published stories by well-known writers, including Arthur C. Clarke and Jack Vance, but it was not successful, and the magazine ceased publication late in 1957.


Read more about Space Science Fiction MagazinePublication History and Bibliographic Data, Contents

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Space Science Fiction Magazine - Contents
... Engel obtained stories from moderately well-known science fiction names for both issues, including John Jakes, Mack Reynolds, Jack Vance, and Raymond F ... Literary Agency, in the words of one historian most had already been rejected at the other active science fiction markets ... Space SF also published Arthur C ...

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